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3D Modeler Jay Kushwara – From Concept to Digital Model

by Paul Harrison & Chuck Paskovics
July 1, 2012

Jay Kushwara: From Concept to Digital Model

Quick Links: Q&A with Jay Kushwara  | 3D Model Comparisons | 3D Gallery
Jay's Figure Resume | Comments Section ( ) | Jay Kushwara's Home Page

The Vintage Collection’s See-Threepio, R2-D2 and Battle Droid. The Legacy Collection’s FX-6, The Clone Wars Aqua Droid and R7-D4. And various Build A Droids including L8-L9, BG-J38 and YVH-1. These all started from a concept. But how did they become a finalized action figure? As Star Wars collectors we often wonder about the exact process a Star Wars figure undergoes before it gets packaged and sold to us at retail. Jedi Temple Archives has investigated this very topic, and with special permission from Hasbro we have interviewed one of their most brilliant 3D modelers, Jay Kushwara, to find out more. Responsible for some of the greatest action figures currently in your collection, we put Jay in the hot seat and asked him a ton of questions about his involvement in the Star Wars basic figure line. His work spans as far back as the 30 (77-07) collection all the way up to the current The Vintage Collection. As collectors, it's rare to get privy information about this side of the hobby so we are very thankful that we've managed to work with so many willing parties to give you a backstage look at it all. We hope you thoroughly enjoy what you’ll find in this JTA Special Report. JTA would like to personally thank Hasbro for giving us the green light to pursue this with Jay, and Jay for his hard work in the Star Wars line and being a great sport working with us.

Please note that the images contained in this Special Report are proprietary and used with permission (Copyright © 2012 Jay Kushwara / Digital Renaissance) and may not be replicated and placed on any other site. Please link back to this Special Report when discussing this outside of Jedi Temple Archives. Please email us if you have any questions concerning this report or our image use policy.

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Q&A with Jay Kushwara

Jay, thank you so much for your interest in doing this interview with Jedi Temple Archives. It's been arduous arranging this and getting the appropriate approval with Hasbro, but it has all been well worth it! It's so nice to meet the people involved so heavily in the process with making our Star Wars figures a reality. Can you tell us what figures you have created?

Sure can, at least the ones that have been officially shown or released. If I mention anything else I'd have to feed you to a Rancor ;-) . I'd also like to clarify my role in sculpting or 3D modeling these figures. Technically, I'm not a designer. The designers are the artists who create the original concepts and input art for the figures. Even though I do a lot of 3D design work to create the digital model I'm not brought on board until the Hasbro designer has done their job first!

[Click here for a complete list of figures Jay has worked on]

Thank you for the clarification of your role in the process. Wow, those are some most impressive action figures. I think all of us have some favorite action figures from that stunning resume. What are your favorite Star Wars figures that you have 3D modeled to date?

That's a really tough question! I don't think I can name a single figure, but let me try and name a few favorites and explain why.

The TAC R2-D2 has the top slot since it was my first project for the Hasbro SW figure line.

L8-L9 is my favorite Build a Droid due to my being a longtime Genndy Tartakovsky Fan! He's also the one droid figure I've done that has a clean Art Deco style. His forms are all simple but really elegant. Not to mention the huge flame bursts—can't go wrong with those!

PS—if there's any chance that Genndy or Paul Rudish are reading this interview I'd love to connect with you guys.

CW IG88 assassin is my favorite hands down for pose-ability. I've seen online photo shoots where he's in poses I would have never imagined possible.

If I have to name a favorite based solely on technical merit that would have to be the Legends C3PO. That figure was the hardest of all of them. I suspect we'll be talking more about that a little later.

Can you tell us about your process of modeling/rendering these figures three-dimensionally in a computer?

We usually start out with control art, either drawings or images provided by the designer. I'll take the initial 2D artwork and use a number of different 3D modeling software packages to create a full 3D version of the character, incorporating all of the engineering and articulation requirements. The sculpting project manager I've worked with for most of the SW figures is Dave Vennemeyer. It's definitely a team effort—Dave's a fantastic sculptor and engineer in his own right and we're constantly going back and forth to work out all the issues that crop up when doing figures like these. Most of the time we're also working closely with designers and marketing people as the figure is being developed.

What do you send to Hasbro so they can begin production on the figures completed in your three-dimensional renderings?

The final deliverable is a set of 3D files that are printed out on a high fidelity 3D printing system. I'm basically sending in a digital version of the complete figure with everything ready to assemble and articulate. It has to be 100% functional in digital form so when it's printed it's ready to assemble and works just like the manufactured figure will.

Does Hasbro ever ask for tweaks?

Tweaks are a constant part of the process. Creating a successful figure involves a ton of collaboration. I'm always showing examples of how everything is looking and functioning throughout the process. Every time a new image is reviewed there are usually comments to address. After I've finished a model that we're all happy with it gets submitted to Lucasfilm Licensing for their final approval.

You have created some incredible Build A Droid figures including HK-47 (undoubtedly one of the most popular), L8-L9 (an answer to prayer for Tartakovsky lovers and one of the most unique and best quality Build A Droid figures to date) and YVH-1. Can you give us any cool behind the scenes information on these? Were you asked to model them with the intention that they would come apart in six unique pieces (for the protocol droids) or did Hasbro work that in at the production level. Are you responsible for any of the coloring or paint job applications Hasbro used? What kinds of reference materials did you have for these Build A Droid figures and can you share any of them with us?

All the Build a Droid figures were initially designed to be just that, and as I mentioned before the digital models had to function just like the final manufactured versions would. We took great pains to ensure that all the parts would interchange with other BAD figures. All of the features and articulation on a figure is thoroughly worked out at the start.

As far as the coloration and paint design that’s also worked out by the designers before I get involved.

Reference can vary wildly from project to project. We'll always get approved character reference from Lucasfilm to start, but I often have to spend time scouring my book collection and web archives to find just the right images. I recall spending a few hours researching just the feet on one particular droid figure! It was crazy to see how many differences there were between versions used in the films. There was another project where I spent another few hours painstakingly lining up details culled from loads of different reference images all taken from different sides of the prop. I approach these projects like I'm doing a forensic reconstruction—not just relying on a few reference images. I'll look for any and every piece of reference possible. If it's a film based character you also have to think about how it was built, what materials were used, was it a suit or a mechanical prop. Every piece of information helps you understand the reference better.

Unfortunately I can’t share the main reference. All of the material I’m given is considered confidential and proprietary. Any time you work on a licensed property you have to sign extensive NDA agreements that prohibit anything from being shared.

The Clone Wars Jabba's Palace is one of the finest Battle Packs done by Hasbro yet. You were both responsible for Jabba and the Nikto Guard from that set. Thankfully the Nikto Guard was release two TCW collections later as a TRU exclusive instead of becoming altogether cancelled. Was it hard to see the Nikto Guard get cut by Hasbro and not know if that figure would ever see the light of day?

Thanks! I had completely forgotten about Nikto not being in the first version—I'm glad he finally made it!

We noticed that you created R7-D4 which happens to be the first The Clone Wars Build A Droid figure (and the only "buildable" astromech in your portfolio). Did Hasbro ask for anything special with this figure other than to make it a Build A Droid sculpt, or were their plans to include other The Clone Wars astromechs in the next mainstream basic figure line?

Nothing special that I recall, just that we follow the CG model reference as closely as possible. It was a bit tricky to get the front opening doors and flip up arms to fit inside the body and still allow space for the standard build a droid leg posts to fit. Though after having done the legacy R2 figure with everything but the kitchen sink thrown in R7 was pretty easy.

You are the proud modeler of the gorgeous See-Threepio (C-3PO) and R2-D2 figures from the first and third waves respectively of 2010's The Vintage Collection. Were you aware of the flack that the C-3PO figure got and did you notice that many collectors' attitudes changed once they realized just how many specific features it had to it that were directly inspired from The Empire Strikes Back?

I honestly had no idea there was any flack over the 3PO figure. I wasn't following the online community too closely, but was a bit surprised when I did find out. 3PO was the single most complex 4" figure I've ever worked on.
 
It may not be obvious, but the amount of engineering and coordination involved in this figure was huge.

It was hard enough to create an accurate 3PO sculpt, let alone one with removable panels that all have to have a minimum wall thickness for manufacturing and then have to fit in all the internal detailing behind the panels! Not to mention having the head, arms and lower shin all removable so kids and collectors could recreate all of 3PO's classic "unassembled" stages from Empire.

We went through a ton of reference—taking into consideration all the minor differences between the suits used in each film. Details like the visible wires that run across the gap between the chest and pelvis plates had to be resolved. How many small square plates were there on his palms? How many concentric rings were there on the circular abdomen plate? What was the correct contour for the layered plates on his pelvis? Every separate body shell piece was scrutinized and reproduced as faithfully as possible. The same amount of care was taken with the internal detailing—striving to reproduce the inner structure seen in Episode 1 faithfully. The only design element/detail on that figure that wasn't based on painstaking research was the detailing on the inside of the removable shell parts. That we had to make up as the inside surfaces of 3PO's body shells were never shown.

Can you share with us as much as you can about the directives Hasbro gave you on this figure? Was this intended to be an Expanded Universe figure originally, or was it an aggressive extrapolation of the C-3PO we see in Episode V?

This 3PO was intended to be part of the vintage line from the beginning. As mentioned above, our goal was to make the ultimate OT 3PO.

If it didn't have the removable panels (except for the back panel), it may have just been the definitive C-3PO figure for all collectors. Do you know why Hasbro had sought out to include C-3PO's Episode I look into this sculpt? (For the record, we have really grown to love this figure and we hope that with a few slight retools that Hasbro can give us that definitive OT Threepio figure, you know a C-3PO without the Episode I specific removable panels.)

I really appreciate your saying that it could have been a definitive 3PO – that was my intent all along for the exterior sculpt of the figure when assembled. I really strove to make the most technically accurate 4" 3PO sculpt to date. To me, Including the E1 interior components along with the "Empire" styled removable limbs made for the "Ultimate" C3PO. He's got features that connect with every film in the series! I was also really inspired by the idea of doing a 3PO with features that had never been attempted before at this scale. I could be way off, but I can't think of any other figure in the 4" SW line that has achieved anything this complex.

R2-D2 is another fun figure. We noticed that both C-3PO and R2-D2 are shorter in scale than all other action figure iterations of these characters. Was this intentional and do you know why Hasbro opted to do this when it makes Threepio inconsistent in the line? Did you reference the original BAR2-D2 from 2004's Star Wars "Saga" line when modeling your own? By the way, we think this figure is another tremendous success and appreciate how much detail and accuracy you put into it.

That's a good question! I know the figure scales are carefully worked out before I get the designs, based on Lucas film reference material. The SW team has tried to up the bar so to speak with each new re sculpt of a character, pushing for more accuracy with each version. I did reference older R2 figures in the 4" line, along with the 12" figure version, but only for the manufacturing approach. The Vintage R2 was built completely from scratch and based on the original production design / technical blueprints. Just like with 3PO, I pushed to make the most accurate 4" R2 yet.  

You were very involved with the first wave of the 2008 30 (77-07) figures (the Revenge Of The Sith themed group of figures). Surgical Droid 2-1B is one of the standouts from that wave. That figure looked very tedious to create. Is that accurate at all? Did Hasbro ever hint to you that this figure would one day be retooled to make collectors an Episode V specific version of 2-1B? Do you know if that will ever come to pass?

I can't speak for any E5 2-1B figures unfortunately. The E3 version was a lot of fun. As much as I liked the iconic connection to E5, the "new" version of 21-B shown in E3 had a much more sinister air about him.

The Build A Droid figures are some of collectors' most favorite. If you can't give specifics, can you let us know if Hasbro has commissioned you to model any more "Build A Droid" figures?

Not at this point. I have no idea what the future plans are for the Build a Droid line. Sorry!

There is a huge fan base of collectors who adore the Ralph McQuarrie Signature Series figures. You modeled the R2-D2 figure for the exclusive Comic Con 2 pack. With Mr. McQuarries' sad passing, has Hasbro given any indication of doing a few more McQuarries figures as a tribute to his body of work? Collectors are desperately waiting for Lando Calrissian, Sy Snootles, and Princess Leia (both Episode IV and Episode V) to be designed and manufactured. Do you think these would ever becomes strong candidates for release?

It was an honor to get to do the McQuarrie concept R2. I was 11 years old when I saw E4 originally released in '77. You know, back when it was just called Star Wars ;-)  I spent that whole summer with McQuarrie's classic book cover and Greg and Tim Hildebrand's one sheet firmly etched in my brain. I'd love to see more concept figures done—but have no idea what's on the horizon.

I know it's not being discussed as part of this interview, but my single biggest professional honor was creating the McQuarrie Darth Vader Concept helmet for eFX. As much fun as the concept R2 was, getting to tackle the first and only authorized full size reproduction of Ralph's original Vader design was a dream come true.

If I don't ask this I am going to be shot by my colleagues. BG-J38 is another fantastic Build A Droid sculpt. This droid and 8D8 share so many unique parts. Is there any possibility you have been asked to model a new head of 8D8 for another future Build A Droid figure?

I had no idea there was so much BG-J38 love! That's great to hear, he's one of the most obscure droid figures I've done. My favorites out of the other "lesser" featured droids were the Treadwell, 2X-7KPR and last but certainly not least the latest version of the Mouse Droid.  I don't have any clue as to future plans for an 8D8.

Lovers of medical droids probably would want to shake your hand over the effort put for in FX-6. I have two questions for you. This figure is essentially flawless except for its center of gravity. But it looks like a different placement of its feet would have resolved this. Was this just missed, or was it just something that wasn't realized at the time was problematic? The second question I have for FX-6 is do you have a complete set of directions on how to properly assemble this droid. There have been rumors for the last four years that something like this was to be included with the figure but it never came to fruition.

To answer the first question, it wasn't obvious at the time it was done. We placed the feet in a way that made sense at the time. Sometimes you try something that should work in theory, and even work as a prototype, then once it gets into production you find out that because of manufacturing limitations, changes, or even just the weight of material used it may not work as planned.

On the second question, I think we might have discussed it at one point, but it obviously never came to pass.

You were heavily involved with the "accessories" (whether droids or actual weapons) for so many figures in The Legacy Collection/Legacy Collection line that ran in its entirety from 2008-2010). Do you stay away from human and alien likenesses or what is the reason you didn't 3D model the corresponding figures that came with these weapons? Are your talents better suited with more mechanical types of characters and accessories? And speaking of the Nikto Gunner sail barge accessory, were you asked to ensure it could attach to the Tatooine desert skiff or is that just a sublime coincidence? And again, I have to ask you this or I will be assassinated. Did you design that gun based on Hasbro's directive that it should fit along the railing of an all-new yet to be designed Sail Barge?

I've developed a niche for myself as a hard surface modeler. I can do organic characters without a doubt and occasionally do (I did a Lizard figure for Hasbro's upcoming Amazing Spiderman line). I love figurative sculpting, anatomy, likenesses and creatures. I started my professional career as a special effects makeup artist and focused on creature work and prosthetic makeups. After shifting gears I worked as a traditional sculptor, at what used to be Kenner Toys in Cincinnati working on lines like the Signature series Alien Resurrection, Legends of the Dark Knight, Batman and Robin, ect. After a couple of years in the trenches I graduated to being a Sculpting Project manager for several lines. Back then I was doing lots of character sculpts, mostly by hand with traditional materials. That being said, after transitioning to Digital work I guess that what I do for the hard surface models has been exceptional in the eyes of my clients, and they would prefer to give me the really complex projects.

I usually tell people that I'm 50% sculptor, 30% engineer and 20% model maker. What I bring to the table is not only being a good sculptor, but 15+ years of experience with engineering, manufacturing, and over 10 years experience developing cutting edge digital tools and workflows.

As for the Nikto cannon—the clip was intentional; it was specifically designed for the Skiff. As for a Sail Barge, I have no idea. That would be one huge chunk of plastic though, and these days with rising material and manufacturing costs I'd hate to think of what the shelf price would have to be!

The Vintage Collection Battle Droid is a beautiful but controversial figure. Can you give us as much insight as you can on why the droid appears "too" small? In all of the movie scenes, the Battle Droids "appear" to tower over most human characters. Wookieepedia has them at a height of 1.91 meters which is significantly taller than an average human male like Luke Skywalker or Obi-Wan Kenobi, both who are below 1.8 meters each. Yet the new Battle Droid figure is smaller than both of them. Was this just a mistake or did you receive reference materials from Hasbro that weren't complete? It's a shame that this droid is so much smaller because on paper it should be the best Battle Droid to date. Many people (including us) still like it very much, but why did this figure turn out so short in stature, or a little short for a Battle Droid?

Thanks for the kind words on the model; as for the size I'm kind of in the dark on that one. As mentioned before, when the figures are developed we're given a specific height to match. I'm sure what we worked to was accurate. It's possible that somewhere along the line changes were made for manufacturing and the height was affected. I don't have any production samples of this figure either, so I haven't had a chance to check his height. Sorry I can't be any more help than that! I do love the design; Doug Chang really hit that one out of the park on Episode 1. Now if only something could have been done about that voice ;-)

Are there any upcoming figures you can tell us you’re working on, directly or indirectly? Please tell us as much as you can (with Hasbro’s approval of course).

Truth be told I haven't done many SW projects this past year. It would be great to jump back into that universe again! I've spent most of my time lately in the Marvel Universe doing lots and lots of Iron Men and that's kept me awfully busy. With any luck, the SW team at Hasbro will find a whole new army of droid figures that have yet to be done :-) Star Wars was my first true passion growing up. I'm old enough to have seen E4 in theatres and spend close to a year afterwards wishing I could get ANY kind of toy from the film. It was amazing to think of now, in this day and age where you can get all the main character action figures from a movie even before it's in theatres!  I had to make my own Darth Vader figure out of an old Action Jackson, sculpting a Vader head on it myself! Kids these days... hold the phone, I need to go yell at some to get off my lawn ;-)

Can you give us a timeline of the complete process an action figure goes through before it arrives into stores for collectors to purchase?

Product development cycles are considered confidential. The only thing I can comment on here is that my process takes 2-6 week for model development, depending on how complex the design is. The whole development process for a figure generally takes 12 months. I come on board after the designs are completed and approved and after I’m finished the piece goes on to the production phase.

Do you buy the action figures you've digitally rendered in retail stores, or do you have them in prototype status or any other way? How rewarding is it to see your creations hanging on pegs at the retail level?

I usually buy them when they hit the stores. I'd venture to say that many of your readers have more complete collections of my work than I do!

Jay Kushwara's Digital Models

2010's TVC See-Threepio (C-3PO) (VC06)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: See-Threepio (C-3PO) (VC06)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2012's TVC Battle Droid (VC78)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Battle Droid (VC78)
Visual Guide Coming Soon!
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2011's TCW [SOTDS] Aqua Droid (CW46)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Aqua Droid (CW46)
Visual Guide Coming Soon!
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

Spider Assassin Droid

(from 2011's TCW [SOTDS] Droid Attack On The Coronet TRU exclusive)
Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Spider Assassin Droid
Visual Guide Coming Soon!
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

PROXY

(from 2010's LC Star Wars: The Force Unleashed Figure Pack (2 of 2)
Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: PROXY
Visual Guide Coming Soon!
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2009's LC L8-L9 (Build A Droid)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: L8-L9 (Build A Droid)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2009's LC YVH-1 (Build A Droid)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: YVH-1 (Build A Droid)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2010's LC BG-J38 (Build A Droid)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: BG-J38 (Build A Droid)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2009's TLC HK-47 (Build A Droid)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: HK-47 (Build A Droid)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2008's TAC Tri-Droid (08 05)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Tri-Droid (08 05)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

2008's TAC Surgical Droid 2-1B (08 06)

Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Surgical Droid 2-1B (08 06)
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

Concept R2-D2

(from 2007's TAC Concept R2-D2 & C-3PO CIV exclusive)
Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Concept R2-D2
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

Assassin Droid

(from 2007's TAC Anakin Skywalker/Assassin Droid Comic Packs (No. 11) set)
Jay Kushwara's 3D Rendering: Assassin Droid
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Visual Guide
See Additional Photography to this figure in our Research Droids Reviews

Full Gallery of 3D Models

Jay_Kushwara_01 Jay_Kushwara_02 Jay_Kushwara_03 Jay_Kushwara_04 Jay_Kushwara_05
Jay_Kushwara_06 Jay_Kushwara_06a Jay_Kushwara_07 Jay_Kushwara_08 Jay_Kushwara_09
Jay_Kushwara_09a Jay_Kushwara_10 Jay_Kushwara_11 Jay_Kushwara_11a Jay_Kushwara_12
Jay_Kushwara_13 Jay_Kushwara_13a Jay_Kushwara_14 Jay_Kushwara_15 Jay_Kushwara_16
Jay_Kushwara_16a Jay_Kushwara_17 Jay_Kushwara_18 Jay_Kushwara_19 Jay_Kushwara_20
Jay_Kushwara_20a Jay_Kushwara_21 Jay_Kushwara_22 Jay_Kushwara_23 Jay_Kushwara_23a
Jay_Kushwara_24 Jay_Kushwara_25 Jay_Kushwara_26 Jay_Kushwara_27 Jay_Kushwara_27a
Jay_Kushwara_28 Jay_Kushwara_28a Jay_Kushwara_29 Jay_Kushwara_30 Jay_Kushwara_30a
Jay_Kushwara_31 Jay_Kushwara_31a Jay_Kushwara_32 Jay_Kushwara_32a Jay_Kushwara_33
Jay_Kushwara_34 Jay_Kushwara_34a      

Complete List of 3D Modeled Figures by Jay Kushwara

(Click the Click here for our Research Droids Review logo to visit our Research Droids Review; Click the Click Here for our Visual Guide to visit our Visual Guide)

The Vintage Collection

Grand Moff Tarkin (VC98) (mouse droid only)

Click here for our Research Droids Review  
See-Threepio (C-3PO) (VC06)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

R2-D2 (VC25)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
Battle Droid (VC78)
Click here for our Research Droids Review  

Legacy Collection

Episode V Concept Art Snowtrooper (BD48)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
Nikto Gunner (BD23) (cannon only)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

Security Droid [2X-7KPR] from 2009’s LC Jawa & Security Droid (BD39) two-pack)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
PROXY (from 2010’s LC Star Wars: The Force Unleashed Figure Pack (2 of 2))
Click here for our Research Droids Review  

L8-L9 (Build A Droid)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
YVH-1 (Build A Droid)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

BG-J38 (Build A Droid)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

The Legacy Collection

FX-6 (BD 28)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
WED Treadwell Droid from 2009’s TLC Jawa & WED Treadwell Droid (BD 33) two-pack)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

Hoth Rebel Soldier (BD 42) (cannon and figure accessories only)

Click here for our Research Droids Review  
Ugnaught (BD 43) (carbon freezing chamber control panel only)
Click here for our Research Droids Review  

HK-47 (Build A Droid)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

STAR TOURS

Signal Droid (from 2011’s ST STAR TOURS Travel Agency)

Click here for our Research Droids Review  

The Clone Wars [Shadow Of The Dark Side]

Nikto Guard [Puko Naga] (2010 TCW TRU exclusive – originally planned for 2009’s TCW Jabba’s Palace Battle Packs)

Click here for our Research Droids Review  
R7-D4 (CW64)
Click here for our Research Droids Review  

Aqua Droid (CW46)

Click here for our Research Droids Review  

The Clone Wars (blue)

Super Battle Droid (No. 12)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
IG-86 Assassin Droid (No. 18)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

MagnaGuard (No. 22)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
Jabba The Hutt (from 2009’s Jabba’s Palace Battle Packs set)
Click here for our Research Droids Review  

30 (77-07)

Concept R2-D2 (from 2007’s TAC Concept R2-D2 & C-3PO exclusive)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
Assassin Droid (from 2007’s TAC Anakin Skywalker/Assassin Droid Comic Packs set)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

Tri-Droid (08 05)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide
Surgical Droid 2-1B (08 06)
Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

Mustafar Panning Droid (08 08)

Click here for our Research Droids Review Click Here for our Visual Guide

Click here to go back to the Q&A

Credits

Interview by Paul Harrison
Visual Guide composites by Chuck Paskovics
All JTA Photography by Paul Harrison and Chuck Paskovics
3D Modeling by Jay Kushwara
Special Report Graphic Design and Layout by Chuck Paskovics (with consultation by Paul Harrison
)

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